“air duct cleaning deals _air duct cleaning and repair”

Joshua and Andre, Orlando did such outstanding work in my house, that I’m going to recommend their services to everyone in our sub division on our list sevre. I was very impressed with the manner and which they was so careful to keep my light carpets clean. And when Joshua showed me the condition inside my furnace I was. Wry concerned because has been doing a very bad job servicing my furnace twice a year for the last 5 years. Please thank your technicians very much on my behalf.
2. Dirt and dust restrict air flow. Let’s say your system is doing a fine job of heating and cooling the air. But if the blower fan or motor can’t turn because of dirt or the air filter is clogged with dust, then the system can’t effectively circulate that properly warmed or cooled air through out your home. It’s still going to run longer and use more energy.
Duct cleaning generally refers to the cleaning of various heating and cooling system components of forced air systems, including the supply and return air ducts and registers, grilles and diffusers, heat exchangers heating and cooling coils, condensate drain pans (drip pans), fan motor and fan housing, and the air handling unit housing (See diagram).
I believe a $3 [sic] pleated cotton filter is all that is ever needed to keep a system running top notch. A cleaning of the blower squirrel cage and of the evaporator [indoor] coil may be needed one time if fiberglass or no filters have been previously used. The return air grille [or grilles] need vacuumed off occasionally, as they are upstream from the filter. The $3 filter should be changed every 3 months [rule of thumb]….and most of them have a little white square on the cardboard frame to write install date…..and the arrow should point into the duct [if at filter grille]….or towards the furnace [if in ductwork slot]…or towards the blower [if in blower compartment]. My two cents…..
Knowledge about air duct cleaning is in its early stages, so a blanket recommendation cannot be offered as to whether you should have your air ducts in your home cleaned. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) urges you to read this document in it entirety as it provides important information on the subject.
Many of the portable air cleaners tested by AHAM have moderate to large CADR ratings for small particles. However, for typical room sizes, most portable air cleaners currently on the market do not have high enough CADR values to effectively remove large particles such as pollen, dust mite and cockroach allergens.
Preventing against air leakage is great, but the only way to keep dust and debris out of a duct system would be to completely seal off the return-air side of the system, which would render the system useless. Cold-air returns will always pull dust and other particles into the system. A high-MERV rated filter is definitely a good idea, but it does nothing to keep the return side of the system clean. Definitely agree though to use foil tape to seal seams, etc. Duct tape dries out over time and as it does can actually add more particles to the air.
Air Quality Engineering manufactures a wide variety of air cleaners and air filtration systems for industrial and commercial applications. Our product line includes mist collectors, welding fume extraction systems, soldering fume extraction systems, electronic air cleaners (electrostatic precipitators), HEPA air cleaners, cartridge dust collectors and disposable media filtered air cleaning systems. We also provide portable and overhead systems, as well as ducted (in-duct) systems for a multitude of environments, including oil and mist collection in industrial applications, welding fume, tobacco smoke removal in the hospitality industry, and air purification in healthcare fields. In addition, we produce HEPA and electrostatic home air purifiers that have been repeatedly ranked #1 in consumer magazines.
Most mechanical air filters are good at capturing larger airborne particles, such as dust, pollen, dust mite and cockroach allergens, some molds and animal dander. However, because these particles settle rather quickly, air filters are not very good at removing them completely from indoor areas. Although human activities such as walking and vacuuming can stir up particles, most of the larger particles will resettle before an air filter can remove them.
Had our ducts cleaned late April, 2016. Sodium Chlorite was sprayed into ducts after cleaning. Ever since, we have been bothered with eye and nasal passage irritation because of a “chemical” and “musty” odor. This odor is present whether or not a/c is on.) We are told the sodium chlorite (“EnviroCon, manufactured by Bio-Cide International) is used in hospital and nursing home settings and is not hazardous to health. The air duct company’s suggestion is that they come out and spray even more sodium chlorite…we absolutely don’t want this done! Have had various other recommendations about what we need to have done to remedy our problem. We will be unable to stay in our home if a resolution cannot be found. We’d be willing to replace the ductwork if necessary. (One professional suggested that the cleaning may have “knocked something loose” inside the ductwork and that is the source of the irritant.) This home was built in 1920…no idea when the present ductwork was installed. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
You should be aware that although a substance may look like mold, a positive determination of whether it is mold or not can be made only by an expert and may require laboratory analysis for final confirmation. For about $50, some microbiology laboratories can tell you whether a sample sent to them on a clear strip of sticky household tape is mold or simply a substance that resembles it.
Ok what you said is true but in most cases ducts are in a duct flex format, and knowing that the dust in people’s flex duct is just surface dust, any real debris that are in the duct itself will result in very little to no air flow which will keep your unit from performing properly, but if it is true allergy reasons then replacing your duct system is better for overall better air quality, plus if you do pay attention to the warranty on flexible duct is that it only has a 10 year warranty and typically only lasts for 20 years so do your research before having a duct cleaning, and to add one more thing if your duct work is completely metal and you can’t see visible insulation then your duct on the inside has inside of it, if you replace that with duct work that is clean metal on the inside and wrapped with insulation on the outside then it will further reduce the air bourne fiberglass and dust.
John and his crew were very friendly and very informative regarding the hvac system and duct cleaning. We will surely call Sears again for this and other services based on this experience. We are very pleased. Thanks!
Most people have no idea how much dirt & dust gets trapped inside of their ducts. It’s truly scary what other things have been found in ductwork too (dead animals, MONEY, etc.) I have worked for the country’s largest duct cleaning franchise company for the past 6 years, and so I hear a lot of nasty stories. Thanks for sharing. Awesome hub!
I had a company come and clean my air ducts (10 registers- 4 intakes with 2 trunk lines). I was okay with the price of $400. Then, they said I needed to have the ducts sanitized and disinfected and was charged another $360. I was told this process was $18 per duct. That’s 14 ducts multiplied by the $18 which was another $252. When I went to pay however – they said there were more ducts and when I protested he cut me off and was very adamant about the payment. I know I should have tried harder but felt intimidated. I’m confused – was $260 a fair amount?
Just read your response on cheap air duct cleaning specials and you hit it right on the head. I called a company that advertised its “spring special” in the val-pack coupons we get every so often in the mail. They advertised $89 for up to ten vents and then $9 for each additional vent. The main trunk lines were $25 each. Everything was fine and the tech who came out was very good in explaining what he would be doing. Of course he showed me that he did a mold test (which they do for free) and the results of the test were that we had some serious mold. The cost to clean this would be $20 per vent. We have 30 vents throughout the entire house. In addition he mentioned the blower motor of the furnace needed cleaning which was an additional $250.00 if I wanted to do it (because it was so hard to get in and clean it). I initially said yes to the blower cleaning and “give me a minute to think about it” on the mold clean up. After about five minutes I went down to tell him no to the blower and no to the mold clean up and he already had the blower out and had started cleaning it. He said no problem he would put it back and then came back up later to tell me he texted his boss and that his boss would offer the mold cleaning for half of what they usually do and he cleaned the blower motor for free since he already had it out. I ended up going ahead with the mold cleaning which I probably should not have but with four kids i figured i should get it taken care of. Probably a rip off but who knows. When it was all said and done this is what I paid for a house with 30 vents and 6 main trunk lines: $409 + $89 to clean a dryer vent + $300 to treat mold in vents = $798.00
A complete and in-depth cleaning requires us to go into every room that contains an air duct or cold-air return. At Alpine, the work will not begin until the floors, doorways and outside wall corners are protected. Slip-on shoe covers, floor tarps and plastic corner guards create a barrier between our equipment and your home.
In addition, the service provider may propose applying chemical biocides, designed to kill microbiological contaminants, to the inside of the duct work and to other system components. Some service providers may also suggest applying chemical treatments (sealants or other encapsulants) to encapsulate or cover the inside surfaces of the air ducts and equipment housings because they believe it will control mold growth or prevent the release of dirt particles or fibers from ducts. These practices have yet to be fully researched and you should be fully informed before deciding to permit the use of biocides or chemical treatments in your air ducts. They should only be applied, if at all, after the system has been properly cleaned of all visible dust or debris.
The benefits of air duct cleaning run the gamut from health-related to financial. Your furnace and ductwork serve as your home’s respiratory system, pulling air from inside your home through the return ducts, where the air moves through the air filter into the furnace to be heated before passing through the supply ducts and back into your living space. Dust, pet dander, debris, pathogens, allergens, chemicals, dust mites—all of these contaminants become trapped inside your air ducts over time, and as the air moves through the system, it passes through these dirty ducts, redistributing the dirt throughout your home or simply depositing it in the ducts where it builds up over time. Air duct cleaning can dramatically reduce the number of contaminants present in your home’s indoor air.
However, both EPA and the National Air Duct Cleaners Association — which represents more than 1,000 cleaning companies nationwide — agree there’s some benefit in cleaning debris from ducts, furnaces, central air conditioners and ventilation.
Improper functioning of air-handling components. When air doesn’t circulate along its intended path, bacteria, mold and mildew can fester. These potentially dangerous contaminants can affect the air quality within your home and prevent you from breathing the fresh, clean air you need.
For truly honest and upfront air duct cleaning services, choose Four Seasons Heating, Air Conditioning, and Plumbing. Let the NADCA certified Duct Cleaning Specialists from Four Seasons remove up to 99.97% of the particles in your ventilation system, and experience drastically improved indoor air quality that will last for years to come.
I am just a homeowner and have absolutely no qualifications, but it seems pretty logical to me that a good cleaning every once in a while is just a good practice. It just seems like too vital of a component in a vital system to never clean.
On the interior, warm, humid air from your home’s interior is blown through the evaporator coil. The cold coil absorbs heat from the air, cooling it, before the air is circulated back into your home. The humidity in the air condenses on the cool surface of the evaporator coil as liquid water, dripping into a pan below. From the pan, the water flows into a drain tube which is typically routed into a basement floor drain, utility sink, or outdoors.
The EPA says that indoor air is often many times more polluted than outdoor air. Many of these contaminants get stuck or even grow in the ductwork, possibly getting re-circulated into the air you breathe. According to the EPA, “Contaminated central air handling systems can become breeding grounds for mold, mildew and other sources of biological contaminants and can then distribute these contaminants through the home.”
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This is really well written & helpful. Just to make sure: so to clean your return register, you don’t need to shut the power off? I wouldn’t think so either, mine looks like yours, just a space under the hvac cabinet, no electric element seen. Thanks.

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