“air duct cleaning deals _best rated air duct cleaning”

Trane® prides themselves on their product reliability. Most manufacturers use the same parts available to everyone. However, Trane® uses their innovations to design, build & rebuild some of their own parts.
Upon installation of your new air conditioner, ensure that it is done by a reputable contractor.  Some contractors avoid properly sealing duct work because it can be costly and time consuming to do. If you are going to spend the money, make sure that it is done right the first time.
Thanks bleedercleaners. Yes and the good news is, in a new home, if you clean the ducts really well right after the home is built, you will cut down on much of the dust forever. Unfortunately, in a new home, the drywall and sawdust often gets into and is swept into the heat vents. Get it now and it can help a lot.
I was with you until you said avoid steaming cleaning or moisture, there is no way you can remove mold or any other type of biological without moisture. The best way to do this is in fact with a steamer using a commercial disinfectant and a non reactive odor remover so your home smells refreshed and not like a hospital . This is directly contradictory to your article.
The technicians were not able to clean our air duct system due to lack of access and size contraints. However,Chris, the technician was very helpful in informing us and making recommendations. The technicians did clean our heating unit. They were thorough, professional and friendly.
I have been an Indoor Air Quality Investigator and HVAC abatement contractor for 32 years. These so called “duct cleaners”, in many cases, are scam artists at best,and some ,(in my opinion), should go to jail.
Have you noticed little wisps of dust puffing out from an air duct every time you turn on your home’s heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system? Have you seen dust or pet hair trapped in a vent? Is there dust coating the grill on the return air registers? These might be indications that your home’s duct work might be due for a thorough cleaning.
The guy that came out first and did an inspection told me that I needed my furnace cleaned. I told him that is new and only 6 months old and he told me it was dirty. I inspected it myself and it was clean! He wanted to charge me 750.00 to clean it! I told him he was out of his mind! I would expect that a company like yours would employ honest people! You lost my business from now on!
I live in a 1950’s ranch house in the South. The prior owners were smokers. Based on recommendations from one of the local conservation organizations, I decided to have a home energy audit done. As part of their findings, they recommended additional insulation in the attic and duct cleaning and sealing. This turned out to be a very problematic process. In terms of the ducts, it was necessary to remove the metal grates. However, these grates had been painted over many times and shoe molding covered the bottom of the grates. The vendor was not able to remove the grates without damaging them in the process. Because these grates dated back to the 1950’s, it was difficult to find appropriate replacements. The ones I finally discovered were correct except they were 1/4″ wider. This meant that the shoe molding had to be carved out. The duct cleaner could not provide any assistance with this problem. It took me a month of long evenings replacing the vent covers myself, carefully chiseling out the shoe molding and repainting. In terms of the extra installation in the attic, the same vendor used blow in insulation. Unfortunately, they did not recognize that the 13 floodlights whose mounting extended into the attic were not designed to be buried under insulation. The problem manifested itself in terms of expensive flood light bulbs failing continually. So, I had to have all of the light housings replaced. Yet another unexpected expense. Despite the expense, pain and suffering, I cannot report any improvement in my heating costs or the “quality” of the air. To be fair, I do not have any allergies and did not undertake this for air quality improvements but rather heating efficiency improvements.
The Indoor Air Quality market has been in a boom in the last few years, as more people are aware of the germs and allergens that persist in their homes. What most contractors do not know is the massive to tap into an open market and opportunity to generate more revenue or start a new division of their existing hvac or carpet cleaning enterprise.
It doesn’t clean all of your ductwork.  It isn’t rocket science – they are literally vacuuming the inside of your accessible ductwork.  Would you pay your neighbor $1,000 to come over with his vacuum cleaner and stick it into your AC vents?
Knowledge about air duct cleaning is in its early stages, so a blanket recommendation cannot be offered as to whether you should have your air ducts in your home cleaned. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) urges you to read this document in it entirety as it provides important information on the subject.
The Rotobrush cleaning process is effective in all types of ductwork including sheet metal, flex duct, and fiberboard ductwork. You can even connect the Roto-Vision video inspection system to the Roto- brush so both the technician and you can see-live-what you are cleaning inside the ductwork!
We are certified by the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA). The NADCA protocol is set to protect consumers against “blow-and-go” companies who use inadequate equipment and methods. Periodic cleaning of your home’s HVAC system can help to prevent the accumulation of pet dander, allergens, construction debris, and other dirt particulates within your heating and cooling system. 
Unfortunately, I’m in the same boat and all you can really do is keep cleaning. A duct cleaning can’t hurt and I also run the fan on my furnace around 340 days a year which keeps air moving through my filter thus catching more of the dust and hair (and of course meaning I change my filter a bit more often than most) but that is about all you can do. A duct cleaning won’t really do much for the ongoing shedding and dust our kids create.
1. Remove end caps from rectangular duct work. If you have rectangular duct work, like in the picture below, you can remove the end caps to access the inside of the ducts. You can slide the “drives” down off the duct and pull the cap out of the “slips.” So long as the duct is not butting up against the wall, you should be able to reach your vacuum hose in through the space uncovered by removing the cap, and sweep out any dust you find. You could even use a flashlight to look inside the duct for dirty areas.
UVGI cleaners use ultraviolet radiation from UV lamps that may destroy biological pollutants such as viruses, bacteria, allergens and molds that are airborne or growing on HVAC surfaces (e.g., found on cooling coils, drain pans, or ductwork). If used, they should be applied with, but not as a replacement for, filtration systems.
Ask the service provider whether they hold any relevant state licenses. As of 1996, the following states require air duct cleaners to hold special licenses: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Michigan and Texas. Other states may require them as well.
Ductwork cleaning involves more components than just the ducts themselves. The air conditioning unit and/or furnace must be addressed during the task. Maintaining these components is key to improving efficiency. The following are average costs of cleaning the various kinds of AC and furnace units.
If you have allergies or asthma, you probably don’t need any allergens or contaminants entering your breathing space! With our truck, the debris that the vacuum pulls out of your air ducts falls into a trap outside , while the air is released into huge filter bags on top of the vacuum truck … outside!
Avoid Sealants and Sprays: Both the EPA and the NADCA recommend against the use of sprayed sealants or other potentially harmful chemicals inside air ducts. Biocides and anti-microbial treatments are also iffy, since the chemicals may cause more harm than good to your health. No chemicals are currently registered with the EPA for use inside ductwork.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *