“vent and air duct cleaning _air duct cleaning deals”

Yes everyone should get all their ductwork cleaned, because it does help, incame down with major allergies and had serval operations on my sinues because of this problem of air quality and dust, plus i almost died from one of the operations, i was suffering so much. Yes you can seal your duct system by buyind duct seal t instead of tape to tape all the corners of the vent system, tape wears out and gets brittle, the sealant you can buy at home depot, and you just brush it all over the connections of your ductwork, it comes in a container and it is like a thick paste and dries making a good seal for your ductwork.
Our technician was extremely kind and courteous. He explained the procedure very well and cleaned up well after he was done with his work. The furnace and air ducts looked significantly better than before and there was a noticeable difference in the performance of our HVAC system.
If they have a website or not means absolutely zero. Check the BBB or search for company reviews on the internet. The internet is great for word of mouth and can save you a lot of time. Just make sure that the sources of information are credible ones and not competitors because the internet also breeds contempt.
Unless you have mold or some sudden illness you think might be related to the ducts, better leave well enough alone. I regret using a coupon for a $69 heating service “tune up”. The only substantial thing I noticed is them replacing the furnace filter with one of MY filters next to the furnace, and I had replace it less than a month prior.
Well, I had the cleaning done. The handler is definitely much quieter. It was explained to me that with the coils clean, the condensation will be able to sweat off instead of sticking to the dust and dirt, therefore the humidity (lots of humidity in florida) will be removed better. I feel as if it was worth it, but, I will definitely change that filter every 3 weeks or so from now on. I don’t want to pay that cost again.
With 2 dogs and lots of dirt outside, you can only imagine the build up in those air ducts over the years. We actually are putting in a new furnace so we are hiring a pro to do it…but now I know what to watch for. Great tutorial and congrats on being Hub of the Day! Wow! Voted very UP and useful.
Cre8tor, this comes at the perfect time for me: the dust in my house has been increasing (and I hate dusting!) and I have been looking to the ads for duct cleaning services with new interest. Thank you for this clear and easy directions on how to do it, I foresee duct cleaning being added to my spring cleaning list! 🙂
I agree that good filtration and a sealed system will prevent the need for duct cleaning. However, when we do get called it is because the duct work has reached a noticeable state of restriction or dust or the homeowner is hyper-sensitive to these pollutants in their home. Most of the time we find that no filter or a cheap (99 cent) filter is being used or they have serious duct leaks in the system. If you are hiring a cleaner make sure they are using professional cleaning equipment which will consist of a rotating brush system and a vacuum source. Be highly skeptical of the contractor with no branded system or the guy who shows up with just chimney brushes and a shop vac. He will not be able to reach around all the corners or all the runs in your system and he will be taking your money for a superficial cleaning at best. Only trust a company that offers VIDEO inspection and more importantly…. a who repairs, installs and seals ducts if a problem is discovered or heaven forbid, created. Good luck and get your ducts sealed if you do have a leak! It is one of the greatest energy losses to a home other than being poorly insulated.
has been dedicated to helping consumers get the real scoop on local service companies and health providers since 1995. Inspired by the frustrations her co-founder had trying to find reliable contractors in suburban Columbus, Ohio, she started Angie’s List to help homeowners find who they should hire and who they should avoid.
Certifications: The cleaning company should be certified by the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA), which sets standards for HVAC system cleaning. The EPA does not certify duct cleaners, so avoid anyone making that claim. Check for relevant licenses and insurance – some states require a license for duct cleaning while others don’t.
HVAC contractors have started using air duct cleaning as a way to close more equipment replacement jobs. Add air duct cleaning as an added value to any equipment replacement package and you will increase your chances of closing the deal.
NADCA Certified Duct Cleaners: The National Air Duct Cleaners Association is an organization of air duct cleaning companies that are dedicated to higher standards of quality and ethical practices in their business. Four Seasons goes the extra mile to meet or exceed the standards set forth by NADCA, and we only hire NADCA certified Duct Cleaning Specialists.
I just had my Air ducts “cleaned”. The person who came to my house works for an air duct cleaning company who uses a professional vacuum. He said the company would charge me about $900 but he can do it aside on his own and charge me half of that. However, when he came over the house, he brought the rotary brush along with his domestic vacuum cleaner that it’s hose was about 5 feet long, I ask him that the wasnt strong enough to pull dust out, and he said, it’s similar to what companies use. I was in doubt and he didnt cover the vents so im thinking all dust must have come out from every air vents. Could this vacuum have taking the debris out of the air ducts? Or how can I myself find out if the inside of the air ducts have been cleaned and no debris is sitting there? I have dust all over my house.

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